Sustainability / Certification
 
   


    ACC
    Aquaculture
    H&N Standards: Sustainable Shrimp Farming/Certification
    C-TPAT
    CODEX
    EAN.UCC Global Location Numbers (GLN)/1SYNC
    Electronic Date Interchange (EDI)
    Eating fish/Mercury levels
    FAO: Certification/Sustainable Shrimp Farming
    FDA/HACCP/GMP/SSOP
    Greenpeace
    Ocean caught seafood
    Packaging
    SQF 2000 standard and ISO 22000

    Seafood consumption in the U.S.
    The Global Food Safety Initiative(GFSI)/ISO
    Testing-before and after shipment


    SUPPLIES OF SHRIMP

    Thailand
    Indonesia
    Vietnam
    Ecuador
    China
    India
    Bangladesh

 
   


Seafood consumption in the U.S.

Currently, the United States consumes nearly 12 billion pounds of seafood a year. By 2025, demand for seafood is projected to grow by another 4.4 billion pounds (2 million metric tons) above what is consumed today. According to the National Fisheries Institute (NFI) of which H&N Foods International, Inc. is a member, the top five seafood products currently consumed in the United States are shrimp, canned tuna, salmon, Pollock and catfish, accounting for 76 percent of total U.S. seafood consumption.

It is expected that fresh and frozen fish products will account for a growing share of overall seafood consumption, with shrimp remaining at the top. By 2020, shrimp, salmon, tilapia and catfish will be the top four seafood products consumed.

Americans eat an average of just over 16lbs of seafood a year, far below U.S. government recommendations that Americans eat at least 12oz of seafood a week or a minimum of 39lbs a year for optimum health. In 2005, only 16.2 lbs per capita was consumed. Out of the 16.2 lbs of seafood consumed in 2006, 4.4 lbs represents shrimp consumption according to NFI. The National Academy of Sciences, the American Heart Association and the 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines advise Americans to eat about two meals of fish per week to get a wide range of health benefits, from heart protection to weight control. That is also consistent with the guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Healthy Mothers coalition.


Ocean caught seafood


Over the last decade, imported seafood became a much greater component of total U.S. shrimp supply. Data from the National Marine Fisheries Service indicate that domestic landings of fish and shrimp has been steady or declining slightly while seafood imports in general are rising, increasingly supplied by the growth in farmed production.

Aquaculture

Aquaculture, and particularly fish and shrimp farming, has grown rapidly during the past few decades. It is now coming of age at a time of increased ecological awareness and environmental activism.

Most shrimp farming areas are in tropical areas that allow year-round shrimp farming.
In addition, shrimp farming requires a coastal location, and in the United States, the cost of most coastal properties makes shrimp farming economically unfeasible. Asian governments understand the need to implement and enforce regulations and best management practices for preventing or mitigating adverse environmental impacts.

FAO/Sustainable Shrimp Farming

H&N Foods International’s supplier selection process takes into account how seafood suppliers cooperate with the Government to abide by regulations and implement best management practices. Our shrimp suppliers are following the principles described in the 2006 FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations), NACA (Network of Aquaculture Centers in Asia-Pacific), UNEP (United Nations Environment Program),

WB (World Bank-Netherlands Partnership Program), WWF (World Wildlife Fund) report “International Principles for Responsible Shrimp Farming” that can be read in its entirety by going to the website www.fao.org. (Additional informative data on seafood in general are available at www.globefish.org)

http://library.enaca.org/certification/publications/
Aquaculture_Certification_Guidelines_Draft_Version_2_17-12-07.pdf


FDA/HACCP/GMP/SSOP

All seafood suppliers H&N uses have been assigned FDA registration numbers to simplify direct contact in case of emergency. They follow U.S. FDA guidelines for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points-HACCP, certified by the respective country’s Department of Fisheries. The HACCP system, which is science based and systematic, identifies specific hazards and measures for their control to ensure the safety of food. HACCP is a tool to assess hazards and establish control systems that focus on prevention rather than relying mainly on end-product testing. The suppliers produce frozen seafood for H&N, in a facility that complies to the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and the appropriate Proper Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) adhering to the U.S.“C(ode)F(ederal)R(egulations)” Title 21, Part 123, “Procedures for the safe and sanitary processing and importing of fish and fishery products”. Copies of HACCP reports and yearly letters of compliance of all seafood suppliers are on file at H&N’s offices in Los Angeles as required by FDA. For further details please visit the website www.cfsan.fda.gov.


CODEX

Good Aquaculture Practices are certified by the respective country’s Department of Fisheries according to CODEX standard. The CODEX Alimentarius is a collection of internationally recognized standards, codes of practice, guidelines and other recommendations relating to foods, food production and food safety and quality under the aegis of consumer protection. The CODEX Alimentarius is recognized by the World Trade Organization as an international reference point for the resolution of disputes concerning food safety and quality and consumer protection. Further information is available at www.codexalimenatarius.net

The Global Food Safety Initiative(GFSI)/ISO

Most of our suppliers, in addition to having implemented a HACCP system, meet the standards of quality management system ISO 9011:2000 (Quality Management Systems),14001 (European environmental management standards) and ISO 17025 (Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories). For further details please consult the International Standards Organization: www.iso.org
These suppliers are audited and certified yearly by BRC, the British Retail Consortium, bringing the suppliers in line with The Global Food Safety Initiative Document, Fifth Edition (September 2007), an effort by U.S. and foreign retail chains to verify food safety. Further details consult www.foodsafety@ciesnet.com

ACC

Some of H&N’s suppliers carry an ACC Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) label on their packaging, signifying certification by the Aquaculture Certification Council. The Aquaculture Certification Council, Inc. is a nongovernmental body established to certify social, environmental and food safety standards at aquaculture facilities throughout the world. This nonprofit, nonmember public benefit corporation applies the Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices standards in a certification system that combines site inspections and effluent sampling with sanitary controls, therapeutic controls and traceability. Further details at www.aquaculturecertification.org


Greenpeace


The Greenpeace organization, in January 2008 (www.greenpeace.org) has issued a publication: “Challenging the Aquaculture Industry on Sustainability”, that carries recommendations in regards to Aquaculture certification (footnote 69, Page 17)
It refers to the recently published document by FAO: FAO Guidelines for Aquaculture certification. Further details on this document please go to:

http://library.enaca.org/certification/publications/
Aquaculture_Certification_Guidelines_Draft_Version_2_17-12-07.pdf

This document in turn makes reference to “The International Principles for Responsible Shrimp Farming”, explained under our FAO listing as the recommended guidance for sustainable shrimp farms.


H&N Standards:

Sustainable Shrimp Farming/Certification


Selected suppliers comply with below internationally recognized standards and are audited yearly by BRC (British Retail Consortium) on compliance:
1) FAO Guidelines for Aquaculture certification-Draft version December 2007
2) FAO The International Principles for Responsible Shrimp Farming-2006
Most of our suppliers, in addition to having implemented a HACCP system (copies of HACCP reports available) meet the standards of quality management system ISO 9011:2000 (Quality Management Systems),14001 (European environmental management standards) and ISO 17025 (Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories).


Eating fish/Mercury levels


Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, and co-author of one of the most comprehensive studies to date on the impact of fish consumption on human health—
“I know I sound like I'm trying to downplay the risk but I really think we are experimenting with people's lives when we give recommendations or write stories or reports that make people eat less fish. We know from very good human studies that fish intake reduces the risk of dying from a heart attack by about a third. And heart attack is the number-one cause of death in the U.S. among both women and men. It's the number-one cause of death in almost every country in the world. And eating fish once or twice a week reduces that risk by a third. So if we're causing people not to eat fish or to choose to eat something other than fish because they're worried that the fish has some mercury in it,
they are increasing their risk of dying from a heart attack for a concern that has not been established.”

TESTING-before and after shipment

Physical, Biological and Chemical end-product testing is performed by suppliers as part of their HACCP plan. Compliance with packaging and labeling requirements, correct weight and loading into reefer containers is supervised by H&N’s quality control staff before shipment.
On import into the United States, inspections by FDA or USDA may be added to the process either by customs and/or FDA authorities on a spot basis, or may take place according to our customer’s USDC inspection requirement, confirming all seafood imported by H&N is of consistent high quality and conforms in weight and specifications to the required standard.


C-TPAT


H&N follows C-TPAT (Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism) guidelines, resulting in a more efficient import process, making scheduled deliveries more likely to be on time, without incurring last minute delays.


EAN.UCC Global Location Numbers (GLN)/1SYNC


H&N has joined 1SYNC, a GDSN (Global Data Synchronization Network) certified data pool and already implemented the process of data synchronization for their most popular products. It enables trading partners to conduct EDI transactions, and eventually to track products through the supply chain using RFID. It is accurate and compliant with universally supported EAN.UCC System standards and leads to significant savings on both the supply and demand side.

• Reduced number of inaccurate orders from our customers and faster order   fulfillment
• Reduced internal costs for handling incorrect orders and correcting   incorrect or out-of-date product information
• Faster time-to-market for new products (near instantaneous product   introductions)
• Stronger trading partner communication and collaboration.


EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)


H&N is capable of receiving purchase orders via EDI, reducing invoicing errors


Packaging

H&N offers custom designed packaging with a fast turn around time, website access to designs allowing faster printing preparation, and Tiger Bay ® branded bags, boxes and master cartons in higher quality materials, three different design styles, that carry clear thawing and cooking instructions, bi-lingual (Spanish and English) wording, “Best if Used by: 00/00/00” information and using the latest FDA Nutrition Facts compliant data, including allergen warning, UPC codes, Country of Origin data, Farm Raised or Ocean caught references.

SQF/ISO 22000

Benchmarking of food safety standards has been carried out with reference to the GFSI Guidance Document. The compliance of four standards-the BRC Global Food Standard, the Dutch HACCP Code, the EFSIS Standard and the International Food Standard (IFS) was announced in January 2003. A fifth standard, the SQF 2000 standard owned by US retail association the Food Marketing Institute (FMI) is now also in compliance with GFSI. These technical standards are critical for food retailers today, but often cannot proceed with recognition of equivalency. GFSI’s long term vision remains the creation of a single global food safety standard. ISO 22000 is the draft international standard for food safety management.

Where Tiger Bay ® products are purchased


SUPPLIES OF SHRIMP

Indonesia, India and Thailand are all major producers of shrimp while Vietnam’s share of total global production has been accelerating. The five Asian countries China, Indonesia, India, Thailand and Vietnam account for 72 per cent of total global production of shrimp.


Thailand

Thailand is the largest and most sophisticated supplier of shrimp to the United States. Shrimp represents about 34% of total U.S. seafood imports and about 25% of total U.S. seafood consumption. The Thai seafood suppliers produce shrimp, fish and squid, with the majority of shrimp coming from shrimp farms. The shrimp suppliers selected by H&N support ecologically sound shrimp farming and have strict quality control procedures in place based on FDA approved guidelines that guarantee shrimp is fresh, correctly weighed and packed and is free from the dangers of physical, biological and chemical contaminants.


Indonesia


Shrimp farming production continues to grow while traditional shrimp catch production is decreasing. Penaeus monodon (Black Tiger shrimp) accounts for the largest share of production though Penaeus Vanamei (White shrimp) appears to overtake it. Penaeus Vanamei is largely cultivated by semi-intensive and intensive farming. Because
shrimp in Indonesia comes from such a variety of various sources, H&N keeps a close eye on the origin of production to ascertain a consistent product.


Vietnam


Vietnam is a densely populated South-East Asian country, bordering China in the north and Laos and Cambodia in the west, with a 3,200 km coastline stretching from the Gulf of Thailand, east to the South China Sea and north to the Gulf of Tonkin. Shrimp farming continues to expand rapidly across Vietnam. Production increased from under 200 metric tons in 1976 to over 100,000 metric tons in 2004, with 80% of this production in the south and two thirds of annual production processed for export.
Today, shrimp culture is one of the most important activities in Vietnam in terms of area, production, employment and foreign exchange. In 2000, Vietnam was the world’s fifth largest producer of farmed shrimp. The fisheries sector in Vietnam exported US$1.76 billion in 2001, twice the amount exported in 1998, making it the country’s third largest earner of export income, and seafood farms spread to cover over one million ha, a 74% increase from 1998. Foreign earnings from aquaculture are increasing annually, and the annual earnings from shrimp alone are estimated to be US$500 million. Vietnam’s main export products to H&N are Black Tiger cooked shrimp, White cooked shrimp, shrimp rings and Fish Fillets.


Ecuador

The second largest supplier of shrimp to the United States, shrimp is primarily delivered in blocks of 6x 4 lbs, and in view of the majority of our customers requiring shrimp packed in one or two pound bags, in individually quick frozen format, easy peel, our imports from Ecuador are limited.


China

China is the largest producer of seafood in the world, representing some 35 per cent of total global seafood production in 2005. Seafood consumption in China is expected to reach 79 lbs per capita in 2020, an increase of 40 per cent from the 2006 average which was at 56 lbs per capita. Consumption rise is in line with increasing purchasing power and strong preference for seafood among Chinese consumers. Total seafood production in 2005 totaled 51 million Metric Tons, retaining a stable year-on-year growth of 4.08 per cent, while a year earlier it grew 4.16 per cent. Aquaculture, capture, production and processing is concentrated in a few regional centers in China, notably around Dalian and Qingdao in the North and in Zhejiang, Fujian and Guangdong provinces in the South.

Shandong, where Qingdao is the capital, was the leader among China’s provinces in the production of seafood in 2005, with a total of 7.4 million Metric Tons. Out of the top ten aquaculture products harvested in Chinese seawater, six are different varieties of shellfish, including the top three. While freshwater aquaculture is predominantly dependant on carps, which make up 72 per cent of the total, species such as shrimp and tilapia are gaining momentum. The growth and successes of Chinese seafood production in 2007 has been overshadowed by a series of import bans from trading partners relating to antibiotic contamination, carcinogens, and before that traces of chloramphenicol.

The EU is China’s biggest trading partner, while the US remains a vital export destination with strong growth in agri- and aquaculture related products. Japan is the major export destination for Chinese seafood, receiving around half of all exports in recent years.

China is the world leader in shrimp aquaculture. With its rapidly growing aquaculture industries, China may soon surpass Canada and Thailand as the leading supplier of seafood products to the United States. Our offices are working closely with Chinese Government Quality Control inspectors to ensure that product supplied is fresh and meets or exceeds FDA quality standards for physical, chemical and biological substances. China is the main frozen breaded shrimp exporter to the United States (60.3% of the volume traded) and is also a major exporter of tilapia, wild caught Pacific chum salmon, arrow tooth flounder, yellow fin sole, Greenland halibut and ahi tuna.

Its dominance in producing shrimp is impressive. Out of the 6.1 million metric tons of shrimp produced in 2005 worldwide, China produced about 2.5 million metric tons or 41 per cent. Consumption of shrimp in China has grown tenfold in the last ten years and we predict that the growth will continue. One of the main reasons why the consumption of shrimp has grown so much is the advances that have been made in the production of shrimp in China, where production costs have been brought down to levels unheard of before. Another key reason is the introduction and rise of the Litopenaeus Vanamei species, which has in less than three decades become the dominant species in Chinese shrimp production. Other inter-related reasons for the robustness of the Chinese shrimp market are:
- A tenfold increase in the domestic consumption of shrimp, whether as raw material for processing or for human consumption;
- A significant increase in the share of processed shrimp for export
China is expected to be able to supply most of the rising demand in the domestic market for seafood. However, a rise in imports of crustaceans such as shrimp is expected.
Therefore, the fact that the country will need to resort to imported supply suggests the tremendous predicted popularity of crustaceans rather than China’s lack of ability to satisfy that demand.


India

The United States is India's second-largest shrimp buyer after Japan. Annual shrimp imports by the US are estimated to be over $3 billion today; India exported shrimp worth $360 million in 2003. The seafood industry was badly hit by the levying of a 10.17% anti-dumping tariff on shrimp exports to the US towards the end of 2004. In value terms, the US accounts for close to 36 percent of all seafood exports from India, but in quantity terms, Europe leads the list. Recently the anti-dumping tariff was lowered to zero.


Bangladesh

The Nov. 15 2007 cyclone that devastated Bangladesh and stymied the country's shrimp-farming industry affected the U.S. supply of black tiger (Penaeus monodon) shrimp. About 70 percent of the country's shrimp production occurs in its three western districts - Satkhira, Khulna and Bagerhat - which were hit the hardest by Cyclone Sidr's 150-mph winds and 15-foot tidal surge (the storm killed nearly 3,300 people).Almost all of the black tiger and freshwater (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) shrimp farms, hatcheries and processing plants in those three districts were damaged by the storm's tidal surge, according to the Bangladesh Frozen Food Exporters Association.
Bangladesh is one of the United States' primary sources of black tigers, next to India, Thailand and Vietnam. U.S. shrimp imports totaled 42.9 million pounds in 2006.

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